Category Archives: 2016-17 Season

Support Design for Sharing

DFS

The Design for Sharing program at CAP UCLA has transformed the lives of over half a million Los Angeles students and their teachers since it was founded 47 years ago in 1969. To give you an idea of what Design for Sharing means to the students and teachers of LA, here are their own words:

I had lots of fun because we got to build a violin. Thank you for letting us go to your school. I loved it when we got to learn about the instruments around the world.
– Amy, Catskill Avenue Elementary School

When I finish high school, I am going to UCLA, and I am joining the dance program. I was planning to quit dance and start swimming, but seeing you guys I decided to carry on with my passion for dance. Thank you for inspiring me and encouraging me to keep dancing!
– Destiny, Southeast Middle School

I really enjoyed the creativeness and originality of the play. This performance showed me that anything is possible and that everyone has the right to share their story and be themselves. […] Never stop doing what you love.
– Tess, San Pedro High School

What an immensely powerful performance and a valuable experience for students to be on a college campus: many students said things like, “Can’t you see yourself being a college student now?” THANK YOU!
– The 8th Grade Faculty, Camino Nuevo Middle School

Composing the Body:
Portrait of a Score

Deborah Hay, photo Sarah Granholm
Deborah Hay, photo by Sarah Granholm

In March of 2010, Deborah Hay performed her first solo in six years at Dancespace Project in New York City. This piece, No Time To Fly, became the foundation of a number of subsequent works. In early 2011, Bill Forsythe’s Motion Bank invited the performers Jeanine Durning, Juliette Mapp and Ros Warby to adapt this score — first as an individual solo and then into a new trio. This new piece, now called As Holy Sites Go was performed in 2012 at Motion Bank’s Frankfurt Lab.

Jeanine Durning and Ros Warby
Jeanine Durning and Ros Warby, As Holy Sites Go / duet

The trio adaptation of As Holy Sites Go, has been adapted yet again, but now as a duet, by two of the original performers, Ros and Jeanine. The digital score of the Motion Bank process, was set by Deborah on the twenty-one dancers of Cullberg Ballet in a new iteration called Figure A Sea. Both of these new works make up this weekend’s program.

Cullberg Ballet
Cullberg Ballet, Figure a Sea, photo by Urban Jörén

The process of this series of adaptations (which encompassed both live performance and digital transcription/performance), is documented on the Motion Bank website, and two of the resulting films are being shown on the large screens in front of the courtyard.

The evolution of this score, from the printed word though many modalities of performance and point of view is a sublime portrait of how bodies compose themselves. The written score of No Time To Fly reads like a prose poem, with interjections of notes, drawings, footnotes, instructions. It is a way of capturing space, and then presenting that space for others to capture, or re-capture, depending on your point of view. Deborah’s works have been described as being “more like rituals than concerts,” her scores give dancers an individual agency that is not as prevalent in more traditional choreography.

From No Time To Fly:
Note: My head is free to look down or away or to turn. It is not fixed.
Note: There is no repetition in live performance.
Note: I neither hurry nor linger.

Deborah’s scores are frequently framed in the form of “What if” questions, many of which are on display in the courtyard. Deborah wrote in 2014, “For as long as I can remember I struggled with whether the questions that are applied in the performance of my work be included in the program notes. My dances would not exist without them. The conflict about identifying the question in the program is that I do not want audiences to be looking for what might either satisfy or not satisfy their beliefs about what they are seeing.”

We also struggled with how much to reveal of the questions and the score before the lights dim and the dance begins. In the end, our wonder and fascination with the score and all it offers won the day. We couldn’t help but share some of it with you: not so that it would provide you with answers, but so that it might encourage you to consider your own questions.

this empty space
a song
an ocean
a figure moves
an ocean
the figure a sea
weaving her destiny
repeatedly
dh, 2012

Welcome to our 2016-17 Season Edition

The event detail pages on our site and in the season program guide offer you a running glance at the tremendous artistry that will again take root in Los Angeles over the months ahead. As you have come to expect, there is much to discover and taking part is fortifying. As the Director of both CAP UCLA (produced programs) and of Royce Hall (heritage venue of repute), it is a true pleasure to unveil this collection of recent work by such distinct voices in contemporary performance.

Though I occupy the leadership seat, what happens here is due to the staff that I have the pleasure of collectively rolling up sleeves with every day. We are conjoined with our Board members – a philanthropic body of individuals that give (and then give some more) – to ensure that this feast of ideas will continue to happen each season. We also work in partnership with esteemed local and national foundations, art patrons, scholars and numerous colleague organizations. In doing so, we play a dynamic role in the arts internationally, while serving UCLA and the greater Los Angeles community.

We spend a lot of time thinking about YOU – the audiences who are passionate about engaging with what is going on in contemporary performance. (Your response and participation is accompanied with great anticipation on our end.)

CAP UCLA programs – on and off stage – are created to strengthen the ties that bind us to continuing artistic achievement. We make every effort to engage you by adding opportunities before or after the performances and we cluster these under the banner of “Art in Action.” For those of you who seek a creative dialogue, more insight, or to actively learn what makes these artists tick or what inspired the work in the first place – I encourage you to choose your dates when Art in Action is in full swing. Every single work of art on this season, whether danced, projected, played, acted, conducted or spoken reveals a sublime global effort toward the art of much-needed perspective. We look forward to seeing you again this season!

Kristy Edmunds
Executive and Artistic Director
Center for the Art of Performance at UCLA

Below are some of the upcoming highlights. Head over to our calendar or check out the Season Program Guide for a full overview of the 2016-17 Season.