Category Archives: Behind the Scenes

Unpacking Daisies

Ronnie Burkett has arrived, along with crate upon crate of the lovingly packed wooden creatures who comprise the cast of The Daisy Theatre.

Last night, during setup at the Actor’s Gang theater in Culver City, Ronnie and his stage manager extraordinaire Crystal Salverda mulled over the precise placement of each puppet, strategically selecting where each one will delicately dangle around the Daisy stage—where they will be found waiting in the wings, slightly shifting at any small breeze.

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Ronnie has a sketch of a plan for every performance, but with dozens of characters to choose from, must prepare for anyone to take the stage–sometimes he even lets the audience vote on who they’d most like to see.

After watching him unpack the glorious Diva opera singer marionette, I felt slightly regretful that, when I saw a performance of The Daisy Theatre in Vancouver a year ago, I cheered for the “Horny Librarian” option over the portly bespectacled glitter-heeled goddess I met last night.

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And yes, there is a horny librarian in the cast. She was delightful. Who knows if she will show up this time around. Come to recall, there’s quite a bit of horniness in the show here and there. Not egregiously so, but definitely hilarity inducing.

I scoped out the Actor’s Gang theater from multiple vantage points. There’s not a bad seat in the place. It’s a stage within a stage within a stage and you’ll be able to take it all in.

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Last night, one of our new photographers in residence Tim Hailand was on hand to document Ronnie’s setup process. We’ll share some shots from his artistic lens later.

I’m excited to see the shows, see who makes it to the stage and what they do in their moment in the spotlight.

 

Warhol, Exposed. Us, Together.

We stirred things up a bit last Friday night here at Royce Hall.

It seemed appropriate, considering the stage that night  was home to live music from an uber-eclectic smattering of modern music artists merged with home movie-esque video footage from the 60s, shot by the one and only Andy Warhol. One of my favorites included shots of Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, Gerard Malanga, Taylor Mead, Peter Orlovsky and Gregory Corso, capering around a couch at The Factory  while punk god Martin Rev unleashed a revved up solo instrumental barrage of sound.

This was another good one too, just a few minutes of an “unidentified man” drinking a coke. Paired with Rev’s high-velocity “Sugar Baby” instrumental, a simple act performed by an exceptional-looking person became artistically mesmerizing.

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Another choice moment of the performance was Eleanor Friedberger’s gentle and loving “All Known Things” set to screen test footage of the luminous Edie Sedgwick. It was so beautiful, a moment gloriously rendered in sound and celluloid. It made me happy and nostalgic, and it made me think about how fleeting youthful beauty is.

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Speaking of beauty, we saw it in spades that night, both onstage and off. For our pre-and post-show activities, we set up a giant screen on the terrace and asked partygoers to step behind it for two minutes of minimal movement—a la Warhol’s famed screen tests.

It was very endearing to stare at these faces, faces of strangers and friends alike. Sometimes it was joyful, sometimes it was meditative, sometimes their faces conveyed deep longing and pensiveness, some stifled laughter as their friends called out to them from the other side of the screen. It was an exposition, an exposé, each person was completely exposed on a large-scale screen, and were required to simply sit and look into the confronting single eye of a camera, without really knowing what pieces of them were being exposed on the other side.

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(Many thanks for the students from the campus TV station ResTV Channel 22 for their amazing work on the live screen tests.)

With some help from our talented friends at Snap Yourself, those amazing faces could take home a Warholized memento of the evening, via our on site Pop Art photo booth.

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There’s something about Andy Warhol. Something about his way of being in the world that invited and continues to invite us to expose ourselves to art in different ways, to be OK with liking the things we like, no matter how or where they land on the scale of pop art, fine art, high brow or otherwise.

At least, that’s what Warhol’s words and work have always done for me. I’m grateful for the very specific kind of  color and vibrancy he brought to the art world, and how inviting and fun he has made it feel for me. And I’m really grateful that CAP UCLA was able to be part of his ongoing legacy. We were early partners with the Warhol Museum and BAM on this unique performance project.

And generally, it was just a great party, a wonderful moment to hang out with what was the coolest audience of the year (thus far).

So thanks for coming out, thanks for snapping yourself, for exposing yourself, for making some pop art with us around here.

Let’s do it again soon.

Here’s me–Warholized. 😉

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Photos by Phinn Sriployrung and Meryl Friedman.

Leaving a Trace of ‘Wordless’ on Campus

Wednesday night, thanks to Art Spiegelman and Phillip Johnston, we found ourselves immersed in a world of wordlessness. With live music, visuals and spoken word, through WORDLESS! Art shared with us images and tales of the artists whose wordless works spoke volumes to an entire community and culture of visual artists, cartoonists and graphic novelists, including himself.

The project definitely left a stamp on campus.

Art started his day on campus by speaking to a convening of students from several different areas of study in UCLA’s Design Media Arts.

Art is beloved by established and emerging artists around the world, including DESMA students here at UCLA.  Art’s e-cigarette and coffee were as omnipresent as his wit and wisdom.

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Meanwhile, our friends at UCLA Special Collections also took up the cause, creating a display of work from 1930s wood-cut artist Lynd Ward, who was the first graphic novelists and major influence on many artists who followed–including Art Spiegelman.

Scenes from the mini-installation in the Charles E. Young Research Library.

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And, on the night of the show we harnessed some creative talent from within our own community to explore one of the concepts from WORDLESS!–that of balancing on a hyphen..between words and pictures, right brain and left brain.

We invited the audience to try their hand at strip-creation here in Royce Hall , under the tutelage of UCLA grad Alexander Hoffman.  Check out a video of the workshop courtesy Daily Bruin.

And some of the awesome results:

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What did you think of WORDLESS? How do you reconcile your right-brain and left-brain tendencies? How and when do you find yourself “balancing on the hyphen?” Tell us in the comments below.

Un-expectations and Loving Life

Sometimes things don’t go the way we plan. We all know this. We adapt and survive. And somehow, sometimes we not only adapt but thrive at the same time.

Late last Thursday we got the bad news that Toumani and Sidiki Diabaté would not be able to travel for their much anticipated scheduled performance on our program the following night. Clearly, this was a bummer. It’s been years since Toumani performed in Los Angeles, and never with his son here. They are amazing performers and we were eager to watch the 71st and 72nd generations from one of Mali’s most revered griot families.

Details were few in the moment and almost irrelevant as it was time for us to rally to make the necessary announcements to ticketholders and changes to the production schedule for the following evening. Luckily, this performance was always intended to be a co-headlining event with the one-and-only, the amazing Rokia Traoré so we knew there was still something great in store.

As I spread the word to the members of the media who I knew were coming, the resounding response was while the Diabatés would certainly  be missed, the evening was still a must-see concert with Rokia and her full band doing an extended set.

I talked to our box office manager who had spoken to several ticket buyers on the night of the show who said they used the Toumani and Sidiki cancellation as a reason to find out more about Rokia, and chose to attend just for her.

I don’t think anyone was disappointed. She was luminous. She was powerful. She rocked. She soothed. She got us up out of the comfy seats to dance along with her and her mesmerizing duo of backup singer/dancers.

At one point in the evening she started talking about why she doesn’t write traditional love songs.

“I am, in general,” she said in her liltingly sultry voice. “In love. With life. And so, in everything I sing, I am singing about love.”

I can get on board with that sentiment. And it seemed to me that everyone who stuck around to welcome this remarkable artist to the Royce stage for the first time, felt pretty much the same way.

We were also fortunate to have among us KCRW’s Tom Schabel. I don’t know about you, but I consider this man to be my world guide. I trust him. I need him to help me hear sounds and songs and voices I might not otherwise encounter. KCRW in general is a great place for just that, but Tom’s focus on artists from around the globe as made him our local ambassador to the music of the world. He was on hand that night for a pre-show DJ set and to talk about the extraordinary music of Mali.

He shared some background information on the Diabate family, noting that Toumani’s sister had passed away which is what prevented the artists from traveling, which helped everyone listening understand, empathize and perhaps even celebrate the present moment more deeply.

The whole situation reminded me of a story I read about Afrocubism. Back in 1996, the plan was to gather in Havana a group of singers from Cuba and a group of musicians from Mali, including Toumani. For some unexplained to this day reason, the Malian artists never arrived. Instead, recording carried on with just the Cuban contingent, and a little album known as The Buena Vista Social Club emerged. (Afrocubism was finally recorded and released 14 years later).

A couple of years after that, I was working for a DVD/home entertainment magazine, covering the emerging music DVD market. The Buena Vista Social Club DVD blew my mind and made me think about the phrase “world music” in a very different and much more eagerly exploratory way.

It’s so interesting to know that it came into being by a sort of accident of fate. It’s had such a lasting impact on my music tastes. Many artists who come to our program have such an impact on my music tastes, deepening and broadening them at the same time. Rokia has taken her place among that list now.

We can’t control the fates, but we can control the way we react to them. Friday night we were thrown for a loop, but we still came together in celebration of music and the people who make music that speaks to our souls, music and artistry that maybe helps us all be just a little much more…..

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In Love.

With Life

Superpositions and Hyphens

One of the beautiful things artists do is open up this doorway of thought that invites us, compels us, inspires us, challenges us to think about our way of being in the world, our way of looking at the world, our definition of ourselves as it relates to the world and to each other.

Sometimes perhaps we stride through that doorway eagerly. Other times maybe we’re sucked through it by forces beyond our control or comprehension.

We think, just perhaps, some of the artists on our coming season will create both scenarios. It’s an interesting idea, this concept of self-definition, of connection to space and time, to memory and to other people.  It’s already happening to us as we’ve launched our upcoming season and begun talking to each other and audiences about what is to come.

Very few humans would define themselves as one thing at one time.  We are all many things simultaneously, constantly (hopefully) shedding preconceptions and habits and developing new ones as we learn and experience new things.

Artists are very good at shaping things– at inhabiting more than one concept, one artistic medium or expression at a time.

Through art we find our personal and collective superposition—that concept of a combination of two or more physical states to form a new physical state.

Why shouldn’t art make us think in terms of quantum physics like this? Art often agitates us in more than one state of being—often inspiring simultaneous emotional and intellectual reactions.  It’s marvelously esoteric to think about, and yet also a concept that will come to life visually and viscerally when we present the L.A. solo debut of Japanese sound artist Ryoji Ikeda, whose piece superposition uses the concepts of data—of the literal 1s and 0s that make up digital communication and explodes it into a source of poetic thought comprised of sound and visuals.

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This train of thought also leads us to Art Speigelman, who in his presentation Wordless! will use words and music to explore the evolution and power of the graphic novel format.

Art has described himself as a hyphen between words and visuals. A thing that simultaneously creates space between two words and also connects them to form another word with a new or different meaning—a superposition.

As a presenter, that’s an apt description of us too. We hold that space between an artist and the audience that experiences it. At the same time, that space is what builds the bridge that connects the two, creating in that moment its own unique position in time.

And there are many such moments to come. We’re looking forward to it.

Join us.

Poetic Thought for a New Season

We’ve been obsessed with poetry around here lately, on a mission to incorporate it into our lives more fully. As part of this ongoing exploration, last year we met Mary Ruefle, a master of erasure poetry who taught us this simple but profound practice of taking written words, marking some of them out and unveiling something wholly new.

There is a lot of poetry to be found in the upcoming season. Explore the 2014-2015 calendar up today on our website. And there will be much more to come from us in the next few months– a new website, and the official season brochure hits mailboxes in the next couple of days, keep an eye out.

We took a pause from the frenzy to sit down with some of that information and in the name of poetry, erase it.  If you’ve ever encountered our artistic and executive director Kristy Edmunds, you know how eloquent and inspiring her words can be. Figuring they would make for prime poetic fodder, several staffers here took Kristy’s welcome letter from our season program guide, and turned it into an erasure project.

Here’s what we covered and uncovered.

We ‘re looking forward to everything we may unearth in the coming season.

 

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Welcome to the 2014-2015 Season

By Jessica Wolf

 An impressive appetite

We love

We thrive

You celebrate and discover

 

Artists

Art Forms

Vision

Turn sound to light

Epic and mind-expanding

 

L.A. itself

A unique world

Synthesizes poetry

Remarkable

And deliriously strange

 

Through masterful hands

Every endeavor

In passion

And an unknown outcome

 

We help the work

Stand as connectors

Diverse, voracious, curious participants

 

Thank you

Artists

Audiences

A virtuous circle

Complex and ebullient

 

Art direct for UCLA

 

 

By Meryl Friedman

 

A City…

L.A.

Standing at the apex

Of delirious endeavor

 

Us

Connectors

Participants

In the complex collaboration!

 

 

By Theresa Willis Peters

 

There is clear evidence…

of routes to one another

 

We thrive, celebrate, discover

We continue

Emerging the vision

Over decades

 

Fans that make the world turn

 

Unseen time

Marks our work

Places and sensations

Poetry

Multifaceted and perfectly scaled

Standing, rediscovered

Deliriously strange

 

Each endeavor

A question

Pursuing an unknown present

Connectors between

A curious common cause

 

Our potential.

 

 

By Phinn Sriplyorung

 

In a city

We LOVE

Center for exploration

Artists

Collaborations

Relationships

Come together

 

Cultural omnivores

Exposed sound

A spotlight celebrates

A resounding, special, mind-expanding

Epic….

Collaboration

 

We are collaborating with L.A.

Our L.A.

An homage to fame

Standing at the apex of the avant-garde

The absurd

And strange

The life of our celebrated modern stage

 

A unique endeavor

In which artists come together in mutual passion

Cause and relevance

 

Entrust us

To be actively present

Us who work as connectors

Artists

Audiences

Supporters

Participants

Enhance the art-filled potential

Of our labor

Field Notes: September and October Performances

Our first month of performances has gone by in a colorful and inspiring blur and it has me waxing a bit philosophical (and verbose).

We started the theater season off with a powerful bang from London’s Complicite. “Shun-kin,” with its quietly intricate beauty, surprising and subtle wit left me with an overwhelming sense of joy and gratitude. It’s probably one of my favorite performances from my tenure here at CAP UCLA.

After one of the performances, director Simon McBurney participated in a thought-provoking Q&A session with the audience. One moment in particular has stuck with me. He talked about the use of puppetry in the work and the way the puppet Shun-kin evolved into a human character and how that progression mirrored her devoted servant/lover’s (and our own) relationship to and perspective of the character. She is, in the beginning, very remote, an imperious and demanding child, untouchable, unknowable in certain ways. But as she exhibits more humanity, more connection to the man who loves her, she becomes more humanlike and finally, in a fit of jealous rage, when she is most in tune with her raw emotions, the actress who has been oh-so-deftly portraying the voice of the puppet seamlessly takes total control of the character.

For me, it serves as a larger metaphor about what we do here. For more than a year before these incredible performers took the stage, “Shun-kin” held some part of our consciousness. As we planned and prepped and as the pages of the calendar turned, the work became closer, more real, until finally it was here and we could revel in our tangible connection to the company, their great talent and generosity and the profound emotions and sensations elicited by this intricate work, which will never be performed by these people and in this way again.

This whole relationship to the art we present– first rather remote and then progressively more intense, morphing into a truly hands-on experience– is common, especially when planning to bring major works of theater and dance to our community, which are often herculean-like efforts and which we take great pride in undertaking. We talk a lot about the ephemeral nature of the performing arts, of theater, of dance, and how we, as the audience, the community who experiences, witnesses and invests some of ourselves in each performance, then becomes the walking “installation” of that ephemeral work.

With Shun-kin in particular, we were incredibly humbled and awed by the outpouring of support from the Japanese community. Lovers of Japanese folk music pounded the pavement to ensure everyone was aware that revered Shamisen player Honjoh Hidetaro was part of the piece.

A member of our own UCLA Community, recent Ethnomusicology grad Kevin Willoughby joined us to add a beautiful layer to our presentation of the work. Kevin was on site throughout the show’s run to assist his teacher, Honjoh Hidetaro. He also graciously agreed to share several charming shamisen performances in the verdant courtyard of Freud Playhouse prior to several nights of Shun-kin, setting a reverent tone for the evenings and allowing the audience to marvel at the skill it takes to play this challenging instrument. Here’s a snippet of Kevin rehearsing in the Freud courtyard.

A Few Seconds of Shamisen from CAP UCLA on Vimeo.

Kevin is the only U.S. student of Honjoh Hidetaro. He has been studying classical shamisen as an apprentice to the master musician in Tokyo for the past four years. In 2010 his teacher has granted him his natori –his professional stage name: Honjoh Hideeiji

Kevin said it was interesting to be back on campus without worrying about classes or textbooks. “It’s also quite different having my teacher here, showing him around rather than following him around Tokyo,” he joked. “He is one of the best shamisen players in Japan, and I am so grateful to have the opportunity to study under him. He is a fantastic composer who has done a variety of different and new things with the shamisen.”

Our own donor base rallied around this incredibly intricate and massive work, with an opening-night benefit party celebrating “Shun-kin” and Complicite. Check out some gorgeous photos from that very special event.

Just a week or so later, our first dance work of the season came to us after much travail. Visa issues and travel delays for key members of Lucy Guerin Inc, required us to combine the planned two performances of “Weather” into a one-night-only event celebrating the debut of this astounding Australian company in Los Angeles.

As is metaphorically appropriate, we found ourselves in a mild maelstrom of technical difficulties, but banded together with the company with flexibility and creativity to weather the challenges. We were able to open the doors to the company’s final tech dress rehearsal for donors, students and ticket holders who absolutely couldn’t make it to the rescheduled debut and quite a few people took us up on it, lingering to talk about the work and the company with our director Kristy Edmunds long after the rehearsal performance had ended.

If you saw “Weather,” you saw what an incredible set it was, and how it set the perfect mood for Lucy’s intricate and often surprisingly whimsical choreography and concept, which carries inherent deep undertones about our relationship to our climate. Thousands of plain white plastic bags hung ominously over the stage, the precise lighting design turning these simple everyday products into something totally ethereal.

Having witnessed a bit of the technical precision and exacting nature of getting that deceptively simple-looking ghostly ceiling set up, I had a slightly rueful moment when I thought about all the work and time and human effort that went into ensuring that a 60-minute piece of art had its all-to-brief moment in our lives. But, I guess that’s the idea. It’s all ephemeral. We have to keep it in our hearts and souls to keep it alive.

I felt the same way a few weeks later as I peeked in several times to see the progress of the elaborate and alluringly frenetic sceneography for Robert Wilson’s Lecture on Nothing. So much loving and dedicated effort went in to ensuring that moment will last forever in our memories in vivid relief.

We took a moment to further honor John Cage that night, presenting his notorious work 4’33” on the Royce Terrace.

John Cage’s 4’33” from CAP UCLA on Vimeo.

And Bob Wilson made the most of his time here, staying late into the night after his Lecture performance, gleefully talking with students and fans, clearly on a high after his Royce performance and also the triumphant and long-awaited appearance of Einstein on the Beach at LA Opera the weekend before.

We were all on a bit of a high after that momentous weekend. One of the first Einstein-related activities in Los Angeles was our special presentation of the Einstein chorus to 1,100 middle and high-school students in a special demonstration performance in Royce Hall as part of our Design for Sharing education program.

These accomplished singers each presented a song that resonated with them, from arias to pop songs to self-composed work, to an operatic ode to the ingredients of a Twinkie. They ended the program by singing Philip Glass’s “Knee Play 5,” which entranced the students and instigated a bevy of questions about how these performers approach learning such a piece of music and how they manage to breathe while singing it. (Answer? They take turns and plan it out!)

We collaborated with Pomegranate Arts, producers of “Einstein on the Beach” and the LA Opera to allow more than 300 UCLA students to experience this seminal work for free, bussing them downtown to watch the final dress rehearsal the night before opening. We’re still hearing from students about how this work affected them. Stay tuned for a short documentary about it that we’re producing with the campus TV station.

All this amazing theater and incredible high-concept productions lifted us way up and our first two world music performances of the season took us even higher.

Our presentation of the masterful Goran Bregovic and his Wedding and Funeral Band proved a perfect opportunity to spend some time with our immediate neighbors and our campus community. We hosted a Balkan Dance Party on the Royce Terrace before Bregovic took the stage featuring Free Range Orkestar, Tzvetanka Varimezova and Ivan Varimezov, and the Nevenka Folk Ensemble.

Folks came, they danced, they sang along in a wonderfully joyous sensation that extended into the hall that night. Bregovic rocked the house, performing for well over two hours and the audience linked arms, danced in the aisles and refused to let him go.

Just two days later another joyous frenzy awaited as the sold-out and incredibly impassioned audience for The Idan Raichel Project reveled in the positive vibes and pure artistry of one of modern music’s most life-affirming and collaborative artists and everyone who shared his stage that night.

There’s so much more to come, from the nerd-rock heroics of They Might Be Giants this weekend to much more from Philip Glass this coming spring. Thanks to everyone who has been part of our story thus far and we hope to see much more of you as the season progresses.

Connecting to Complicite

We’re spending the next several weeks immersed in the final details of many of our upcoming programs, but especially for our presentation of Complicite and Setagaya Public Theater for Shun-kin, which kicks off our ambitious 2013-2014 slate of theater programming.

It’s an enormous logistical undertaking to bring an international theater company and all its crew, physical materials and performers to the U.S. And, essentially our presentation of Shun-kin entails the wrangling of two companies with performers and producers from London’s Complicite and a cast from Setagaya Public Theater of Japan. It is the kind of undertaking that can only happen when there is an extreme amount of ideological will, passion, and of course physical resource.

It is, for all its Herculean qualities, also quite a joyful effort and one we consider well worthwhile. This is only second time Complicite has appeared at UCLA. The last time was more than a decade ago in the 2002-2003 UCLA Live season when Simon McBurney brought his company to the program along with The Emerson String Quartet for the West Coast premiere of “The Noise of Time,” an eclectic multimedia production based on the haunted life of the great Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich.

Our upcoming presentation of Shun-kin is also a West Coast premiere, and one of only three U.S. stops on a very exclusive tour–last month the troupe performed at New York’s Lincoln Center and travels to the University of Michigan shortly before its UCLA engagement.

We’re so grateful for the excitement and support we’ve already experienced around this incredible work, and more keeps ramping up every day. We were very proud to collaborate with REDCAT’s Radar L.A. Festival and make Complicite part of the third-annual celebration of contemporary international theater. The full Radar L.A. program and schedule has officially been announced and it is full of artists from around the world, as well as acclaimed local companies.

Speaking of fellow theater folks, we’re also delighted that celebrated film actor and local theater booster/creator Tim Robbins has graciously joined the host committee for our opening-night benefit celebration. Tim joins a group of passionate and engaged CAP UCLA supporters as we welcome this extraordinary company back to Los Angeles, and as we raise funds in an effort to ensure the future inclusion of these challenging and important works and companies.

If you think our local arts culture becomes greater by having such art and artists bring their energy to it on a regular basis, we encourage you to join us for the Shun-kin opening-night benefit September 26. It will be a very special evening of a Japanese street fair to be held on the charming Coral Tree Walk, which borders Macgowan Hall and Freud Playhouse. You can support this opening-night revelry and our overarching international theater imperative at two different levels. If you have the means, we can guarantee an evening to remember and a great deal of gratitude from our organization and the artists we present.

One of those artists, Simon McBurney, founder of Complicite and director of Shun-kin has made his mark on the stage and film and on fellow artists. We also recently discovered that one of McBurney’s own mentors, French theater and clown master Philippe Gaulier will be in Los Angeles for the first time in the weeks prior to our presentation of Shun-kin.

From August 26-September 6 The Clown School is offering an exclusive chance for local artists to learn under this master in an intensive workshop. As of this writing, there were just six spots left. If you’re intrigued by the art of clown, this is a rare opportunity to learn from a master. There are also a limited number of $20 tickets to observe Gaulier’s final workshop with his local students on Sept. 6.

McBurney was a student at École Philippe Gaulier, a theatre workshop that influenced the founding and ongoing approach of Complicite.

David Bridel, who runs The Clown School (and is also Associate Dean in the School of Dramatic Arts at USC, but we don’t hold that against him), gave us a heads-up about Philippe’s first-time master class work in our city and offered a great impromptu testimonial for the appearance of Complicite on our season.

“Along with Philippe, Complicite are responsible for rearranging my theatrical imagination entirely with their seminal works of the last 25 years,” Brindel said.

That, my friends, is kind of what we’re after. We’re after those moments, and we want to continue to bring the people and works of art that can bring that rearrangement to our lives.

It was also energizing to discover (long after the program was set) that UCLA has a unique aesthetic tie to Shun-kin and the writing that inspired its creation. I mentioned in a previous blog entry that former UCLA professor Charles Moore wrote the forward to Junichiro Tanazaki’s “In Praise of Shadows.” Shun-kin is based in part on this and other writings from the celebrated Japanese author and it was a thrill to uncover that inherent link to the gestalt of this place of learning and advancement.

These encounters are delightful, especially in the sense that they are not exactly rare. It is not a surprise to discover the versatile, personal and far-reaching influence of artists and their work, but it is definitely rewarding and encourages us to redouble our efforts to bring that vision and influence to the greatest possible audience with the greatest possible impact.

Join us as we connect with Complicite next month.