Tag Archives: Fool’s Gold

The Art of Intention

As a presenter of ephemeral art, we talk a lot about “purposeful intent,” and how it is the engine that drives our mission.

We started 2013 with that mission in full effect and have also been fortunate to spend this New Year surrounded by the purposeful intent of some truly astonishing artists.

Cheek by Jowl’s early-January performances of a 400-year-old and yet still utterly shocking work of English drama illuminated just how powerful intention can be. It is companies like Cheek by Jowl who keep ancient words and thoughts and language very much alive and give them shape and form. Classic theater texts like John Ford’s would not live on the way they do without the purposeful intent of artists like the performers, directors and crew of companies like Cheek by Jowl and we were honored to host the final performances of the ever-controversial “‘Tis Pity She’s a Whore.”

Avant-pop violinist Amadeus Leopold brought us a fascinatingly purposeful look at his own highly theatrical approach to classical music. In an oddly compelling blend of bondage gear and blood capsules, he confessed to “the murder of Hahn-Bin,” rising anew as the one-and-only Amadeus Leopold and treated us to a recital that straddled virtuosic skill and highly intentional imagery.Just two weeks ago, a tiny but by no means diminutive, force of nature blew through our lives as Meredith Monk and her acclaimed vocal ensemble prepared for the world premiere of her “On Behalf of Nature.” As the name implies, this deep, profound and meditative piece was incredibly purpose-driven. It is not in Monk’s nature to outright preach or create a work of abject activism. But there was a wistful sadness, and an elegiac longing in the intricately staged theatrical moments of “On Behalf of Nature,” deftly woven into the beautiful vocal and instrumental compositions. We were meant to leave that space ruminating on our own interpretation of our place in nature, our power as humans to either destroy or preserve it, our responsibility to it and to ourselves.

Leading up to the performances, Meredith re-visited the work she began with students last spring as CAP UCLA’s first resident artist, working with them to craft a subtle and highly-individualized pre-show installation that those students (and a few art-loving non-students!) performed in the courtyard of the Freud Playhouse prior to every showing of “On Behalf of Nature.” It was simultaneously conspicuous and understated in a way only Meredith could create and it set an incredibly appropriate tone for the audience before they even entered the theater.

Watching these students interact with Meredith Monk in those days before the performances, it was clear that part of her purpose as an artist is to pass along elements of her craft to a new generation, and it is clearly something that will echo long into their futures. These students and members of our campus community quite literally, as they rehearsed in uncharacteristically frigid Los Angeles temperatures, warmed to Meredith like moths to a flame.

I watched her sit within a circle of them as they rehearsed a brief vocal refrain, turning her head from one to another, smiling with approval and almost, it seemed to me, in blessing.

Meredith Monk performing “On Behalf of Nature” Freud Playhouse Jan. 18-20

It was a beautiful moment to witness and a beautiful one for the students involved to experience. But you don’t have to take it from me. Read first-hand from one student-participant’s perspective.

Just last weekend we were incredibly proud to be a home-away-from-home for Australia’s Back to Back Theatre, in the company’s first visit to Los Angeles. Their truly compelling and uniquely crafted original work “Ganesh Versus the Third Reich” was moving and stimulating as it challenged us to consider who has the right to tell a story and how.

These tireless storytellers approach the world from a different point of view. As performers with intellectual disabilities, their worldview often comes from a place of marginalization, and almost always from a sense of “otherness.” The actors and creators here last week were incredibly generous with our audience and our community, sharing their work and insight into their creative process with high school students from across Los Angeles, with students on this campus, and with our own audience Saturday night in a candid Q&A session. We were enthralled company’s bold creativity and intentional mission to set askew our own notions of power, stories and art itself.

It serves us to be intentionally set off our axis once in a while, I think. And many of our visiting artists did that in varied ways this month.

I will wind this long-windedness up with a closing thought about this Friday night, and a bit of a challenge.

Coming up Feb 1, is a concert from “the Hendrix of the Sahara,” Vieux Farka Touré who will perform in tribute to his legendary father Ali Farka Touré. LA’s own afrobeat collective Fool’s Gold opens the show.

Typically this would be just another amazing Royce Hall music moment from another amazing musician.
But, this Friday night serves another purpose–to shine a spotlight on the heartbreaking situation in Ali and Vieux’s homeland of Mali, where the rich culture of music and art came under attack by Islamic fundamentalists.

It’s an unfathomable situation, and one that has only recently started to improve, slowly. Still, it remains somewhat under the radar in U.S. media coverage and general public attention. But Mali matters.

Mali and its rich musical history matters to Fools Gold. The group has been greatly inspired by the artists and music from this part of the world, and is looking to help affected people in the area. They have partnered with an organization called African Sky, which sends humanitarian aid to Mali.

Come to Royce Hall Friday night, hear some amazing music both directly from and inspired by Mali, and check out the limited-edition T-shirts designed by the mission-driven design collective
Upperatus, which will be on sale at the Fool’s Gold merch table. Proceeds from the sale of these T-shirts will go to African Sky.

Many thanks to all of you who joined us for a January filled with artistic riches. And there is so much more to come. We hope to see you soon!

Summer in LA: Love the Free-Concert Frenzy

It’s hard to believe that summer’s so close to over. Los Angeles becomes a veritable playground of free music during the summer and we’ve enjoyed every moment of it. A few of us even took a field trip downtown one day last month to catch a Brookfield 7th and Fig afternoon concert just because we’re suckers for some good Flamenco guitar.

It seems like more free concert series crop up every year, in increasingly unique venues and artist pairings. James Murphy merged seamlessly with the crazypants visuals of MOCA’s unique and funky Transmission L.A. installation early in the summer. Last month, EDM statesman Moby merged not-quite-as seamlessly with the Annenberg Space for Photography, which was clearly not emotionally or logistically prepared to handle the frenzied loyalty of the man’s Los Angeles fan base. Still, once settled, a great time was had by all who made it in and all the kinks seemed to have been worked out by the following weekend’s albeit tamer frenzy for the bombastic groove of Portugal the Man. CAP UCLA’s student arm SCA hosted this up-and-coming group in Royce Hall in May in a show that surely inspired some lifelong fandom.

Moby at Who Shot Rock N Roll by Leslie Kalohi via Flickr

Tonight’s another interesting pairing with Zola Jesus and Active Child at MOCA. I’m heading down there myself, hoping to make the trek from the Westside to downtown in time to catch some quality weirdness from Ariel Pink’s DJ set.

That’s another thing I love about this summer phenomenon, it forces us gleefully out of our usual routines and neighborhoods and into situations and locations where we might not normally interact. I’m a decade-long Westsider who rarely roams east of UCLA (except for concerts) and judging by the Thursday night Santa Monica traffic battle in the summer, seems like the reverse is true when it comes to the Twilight Concert series on the pier.

Tomorrow night’s another great one that will probably set me roving eastward—Fool’s Gold at Levitt Pavillion Macarthur Park. We’re thrilled to have Fool’s Good on the bill this year with Vieux Farka Touré. They never disappoint. And dancing in the grass to a singularly danceable sound? What better way to spend a Saturday night.

The summer concerts may come to an end soon, but the great weather will last for a bit, so let’s all take advantage of this amazing place we call home, maybe hit up a few Hollywood Bowl shows before the season ends?

Happy Friday, go out and play.