Tag Archives: Vincent Van Gogh

From the Center: Leonard Nimoy’s ‘Vincent’–Little Theater April 17-19, 2015

Unsigned editorial from the performance program notes. 

This July marks the 125th anniversary of Vincent Van Gogh’s death. In the intervening century-plus, the images he created in his life have become an indelible part of popular culture.

Vincent Van Gogh was just 37 when he died. His years as a working artist were largely made possible by the unflagging emotional and financial support of his brother, Theo. Sadly, early 2016 will also mark the 125th anniversary of Theo Van Gogh’s death as well. He died just six months after his brother.

Together they left behind an important and powerful legacy in the art world, Vincent through his works and Theo, as not only a patron of his sibling, but as an art dealer who helped shepherd the early careers of such Van Gogh contemporaries as Monet and Degas.

Vincent is a work of performance laden with memory and great storytelling potential that can be extracted from the art of archiving. The telling of this tale is made possible thanks to the careful preservation of hundreds of letters sent between these two devoted brothers.

Vincent also carries within it an inherent inspiration for gratitude. As we experience this story, we can be grateful for the incredible works Vincent Van Gogh brought into the world, images that continue to pervade our culture. We are grateful for Theo Van Gogh, for his passionate support of artists and belief in their contributions to society.

We are grateful to Jean-Michele Richaud, the extraordinary artist who so lovingly performs this intimate work of theater here and continues to share it worldwide.

As this performance celebrates a great artist as well as a great supporter of the arts, we are also given pause to remember and give thanks for the remarkable man who was inspired to write this work of theater.

Leonard Nimoy was not only a great artist of his time, but a passionate supporter of fellow artists and artistic endeavor.

He is dearly missed and dearly beloved.

How fortunate we all are that he left so much of himself behind for us and future generations to experience, from his films and photography to his words of poetry and the words we will hear on stage today. Nimoy himself ensured that an archive of his passions and vision will live long and prosper.

Thank you for joining us.