Tickets
Presenting Allen Ginsberg’s Kaddish live on the Royce Hall stage opens myriad opportunities to reflect on how Los Angeles, along with New York and San Francisco, was a thriving artistic hub of the post-World War II Beat era.

 I’m a Stranger Here Myself, is an immersive program of readings, lectures, screenings and exhibits that explore the unique history and influence of Beat culture in Los Angeles.

Click here for more information on any of the following events, or to reserve seats or purchase tickets.
Claiming Ginsberg:
An Evening of Allen Ginsberg and Friends
Beyond Baroque (681 Venice Blvd., Venice, CA 90291)
Saturday, April 6 at 8 pm
General admission $15 in advance through Event Brite and $20 at the door; $10 for students and seniors; $8 for Beyond Baroque members.

A mixed bag of photo essay, film, story, and poetry by and about Allen Ginsberg by poets and performers and a special musical guest. Presented by Eve Brandstein's Poetry in Motion.
Becoming Beat and Post-Beat in L.A.: Strange Facts and Fictions About the Los Angeles Poetry Renaissance
Bonnie Cashin Lecture at the UCLA Charles E. Young Research Library Main Conference Room
Thursday, April 11 at 4 pm
Limited free seating; RSVP by April 4 to 310.206.8526 or rsvp@library.ucla.edu

Poet and professor William Mohr will address the erasure of L.A. literary history; the voices, institutions, and connections that characterized its literary milieu; the city as one of the most active sites for literary magazine production in the country; and the diverse poetic endeavors in Southern California that still linger as alternative models to both the Beats and academics
I’m A Stranger Here Myself: Poets in Post-WWII L.A.
Free Exhibit at UCLA Charles E. Young Research Library Department of Special Collections
April 11 – June 14
(Open Mon - Sat 10 am - 5 pm)
Using historical documents including photographs, manuscripts, recordings, and correspondence, this exhibit places the Beats within the complex and contentious literary context of L.A. during the McCarthy era. Its title is taken from “At the Station,” a poem by Los Angeles poet Don Gordon (1902-89), who made his name as a passionate and outspoken presence called before the U.S. House of Representatives Un-American Activities Committee.
Beat 101
Free Exhibit at the UCLA Powell Library Rotunda
April 11 – June 14
(Open Mon - Thu 7:30 am - 11 pm, Sat 9 am - 5 pm, Sun 1-10 pm)
This exhibit will feature books, journals, photos, and audio providing an introduction to the Beats and the impact of Beat culture on L.A., including Ginsberg’s reading at Royce Hall in the 1980s.
Live Nude Poetry: Los Angeles Poets Celebrate National Poetry Month
Beyond Baroque (681 Venice Blvd., Venice, CA 90291)
Saturday, April 13 at 8 pm
$10 general admission, $6 students and seniors, free to Beyond Baroque members

Hosted by Carlye Archibeque, this evening will feature L.A. poets reading their own work and work by departed local luminaries. Participants will include Will Alexander, Beyond Baroque poet-in-residence; Kamau Daaood, co-founder of the World Stage in Leimert Park; Eloise Klein Healy, L.A.’s first poet laureate and Beyond Baroque alumna; Suzanne Lummis, Los Angeles Poetry Festival founder; Harry Northrup, Beyond Baroque alumnus; and Holly Prado, Cahuenga Press co-founder.

Organized by Beyond Baroque and co-sponsored by the UCLA Library.
Like, Dig: Beats in the UCLA Film & Television Archive
UCLA Charles E. Young Research Library Presentation Room
Monday, April 15 at 1 pm
Free, but limited seating; seating on a first-come basis

A curated selection of vintage local and network television footage featuring beatniks, beat poets, and their hangouts in L.A., including the famous Ash Grove. Extensive archival clips of the real and the imagined Beat scene will be screened in glorious back and white from long-forgotten local documentary broadcasts and kitschy prime time programming of the 1950s and ‘60s, featuring Jack Kerouac, John Cassavetes, Lou Gottlieb, Vito Paulekas, and many others.  No squares allowed.
A Chaos of Creativities: L.A. Poets Talk About History
UCLA Charles E. Young Research Library Presentation Room
Tuesday, April 16 at 4 pm
Free, but space is limited; RSVP by April 12 310.206.8526 or rsvp@library.ucla.edu

Leading L.A. poets discuss what it was like to associate with the important figures of the post-World War II literary scene and how that historical period has influenced their lives and work.  Panelists include Wanda Coleman, Richard Modiano, William Mohr, Estelle Gershgoren Novak, Julia Stein, and Paul Vangelisti.
The Holy Barbarians: The Beat Scene in Los Angeles, 1950-2013
Beyond Baroque (681 Venice Blvd., Venice, CA 90291)
Saturday, April 27 at 8 pm
$10 general admission, $6 students and seniors, free to Beyond Baroque members

Hosted by S. A. Griffin, Beat and post-Beat L.A. poets Pegarty Long, Steve Abee, Doug Knott, Bob Branaman, Frank T. Rios, and Ellyn Maybe will read their own works as well as poems by seminal Venice Beats including Philomene Long, Stuart Z. Perkoff, John Thomas, Alexander Trocchi, Tony Scibella, and post-Beat Scott Wannberg. Yama Lake will be reading Larry Lake. Marsha Getzler will be reading Tony Scibella