A Moment With Artists-in-Residence

“Performance doesn’t just magically appear on a stage. Behind every work, there are years of creative development, months of rehearsal and a continual pursuit of support.” — Kristy Edmunds, CAP UCLA’s Executive and Artistic Director

Each year since 2012, CAP UCLA has welcomed a new cohort of six to 12 artist residents and offered resources, connections and more to support their process of bringing an idea to the stage. No two residencies look the same, in part, due to mentorship and guidance by our Executive and Artistic Director Kristy Edmunds. The CAP UCLA staff works to meet the artists where they are, often providing creative time and necessary space for the development of new work.

Some residencies last from conception to production, where we are along for the full ride. The White Album by Joan Didion created by Lars Jan/Early Morning Opera, presented in April of 2019, was such a project. For this, CAP UCLA partnered with Ucross Foundation in Wyoming, a Research and Development lab for the arts, to provide a month-long residency in 2018 to develop the work in an intensive and uninterrupted environment. About the residency, Jan said, “removed from the patterns of our daily lives, our group of artists was able to draw nourishment from the stunning beauty of the natural landscape and grounds, as well as the generous ethic of incubation guiding the program and staff there, to connect with a creative and personal intensity unparalleled in other settings.”

Other artists, like choreographer Ann Carlson, had ideas for years, but lacked the time and space to bring them to fruition. The interruption to our daily schedules created by the pandemic provided Carlson with the time and CAP UCLA provided the space. Describing her time in the Royce Hall Rehearsal Room, she said, “for me, a residency can be a setting aside of body, mind, space and time for working, for waiting, for opening to the next idea, or to give room (literally) for ideas to emerge, to take shape, to shift from a gentle haunting towards a concrete thing in the world.” Unlike The White Album, Carlson’s intended solo may become something else or take more time, but it was “a chance to reach into those barely there impressions, those shy or bold things that tend to prefer more private pockets.”

Even during the global pandemic when the majority of the performing arts have been restricted to the digital stage, artists need a space to create, to make sure their work is ready when live performance is able to return. Carlson added, “in the context of the virtual spaces that are part of life now, a brick-and-mortar residency feels rare, a place to savor, both the place itself, the comings and goings to it, and what happens as a result of residing in it.”

This is also true for multidisciplinary artist Annie Saunders, who is in the rehearsal room this week working on a multiformat piece entitled Rest! Saunders says, “space and time are so valuable in the creative process, just the time to let the ideas breathe and come into themselves. The space in the rehearsal room especially lets us air things out, imagine them in large rooms, large stages, encourage them to unfurl and become the most of themselves they can be. It’s a gift. And we are in the gift giving business.”

Artists are not the only ones who benefit from the CAP UCLA residencies. They also allow you, our audiences, to follow a project from when it is just a blip in an artist’s mind to the moment when you are sitting in the audience enjoying the fully produced work. Many of the works that result from these residencies appear in future CAP UCLA seasons. It is not an easy task to decide who will be invited to participate in the program. As part of the selection criteria Edmunds “considers the work L.A. needs to see right now, [and] which artists are on the brink of something brilliant.”

The creative process takes time, a resource we all could use more of. We know you can’t give us time, but you can show your support by making a donation. Please give what you can to ensure that CAP UCLA can continue our commitment to artists and the development of new work that can be presented on our stages in the near future.